Courses

Spring 2018 Courses

Course # CRN Title Instructor Schedule
GE 10101-01 20393 Beginning German I Lange M W 3:30P - 4:45P
F 3:30P - 4:20P
GE 10101-02 21883 Beginning German I Hawkins M W 12:30P - 1:45P
F 12:50P - 1:40P
GE 10102-01 20996 Beginning German II Kaupp M W 3:30P - 4:45P
F 3:30P - 4:20P
GE 10102-03 26882 Beginning German II Kaupp M W 12:30P - 1:45P
F 12:50P - 1:40P
GE 10312 25566 Intensive German II Weber M W F 10:30A - 11:20A
T R 11:00A - 12:15P
GE 20113 24736 German for the Business World Weber T R 9:30A - 10:45A
GE 20201-01 20779 Intermediate German I Hawkins M W F 9:25A - 10:15A
GE 20201-02 26883 Intermediate German I Norton M W F 3:30P - 4:20P
GE 20202 20687 Intermediate German II DellaRossa M W F 2:00P - 2:50P
GE 20420 30044 Marx, Nietzsche, Freud Norton M 12:30P - 1:45P
GE 30304 30045 German Literary & Cultural Tradition(s) DellaRossa M W F 3:30P - 4:20P
GE 30305 30046 Contemporary German Roche M W F 11:30A - 12:20P
GE 30464 30808 German History, 1740-1870 Deak M W 3:30P - 4:20P
GE 32302 26131 Conversational German TBA T 5:05P - 5:55P
GE 33000 25056 Exploring International Economics DellaRossa M 5:00P - 6:00P
GE 33411 30523 Berlin SONAR: Architecture & Design Pabsch TBA
GE 43300 30047 Seminar in German Studies Roche M W 12:30P - 1:45P
GE 43402 30048 Holocaust in German/US Memory Faisst T R 3:30P - 4:45P
GE 48499 26884 Senior Thesis Dziadula TBA
GE 60312 25591 Intensive German II Weber M W F 10:30A - 11:20A
T R 11:00A - 12:15 P


Complete Course Offerings

GE 10101 – Beginning German I
An introductory course of the spoken and written language. Aims at the acquisition of basic structures, vocabulary, and sound systems. For students with no previous study of the language.

GE 10102 – Beginning German II
Continuation of an introductory course of the spoken and written language. Aims at the acquisition of basic structures, vocabulary, and sound systems.

GE 10111 – Intensive Beginning German I
In this course, students will develop skills in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing German. They will also attain a grasp of the basic structures of the language. During class, emphasis will be placed on using the language to communicate and interact in a variety of situations and contexts. In addition, there will be a comprehensive introduction to the culture of German-speaking countries.  This course is intended for any student who wishes to develop German skills rapidly and be immersed in the language on a daily basis.  It is ideal and highly recommended for students who wish to study in a German speaking-country, and especially for students who plan to participate in the BCGS study-abroad program in Berlin.

GE 10112 – Intensive Beginning German II
In this course students will continue to develop and improve skills in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing German. They will also attain a grasp of the essential structures of the language. During class, emphasis will be placed on using the language to com­municate and interact in a variety of situations and contexts. In addition, there will be a comprehensive introduction to the culture of German-speaking countries.  This course is strongly recommended for students who wish to participate in the study-abroad program in Berlin or in a summer language program in Germany. It is also ideal for any student who wishes to make rapid progress in German language skills and cultural competence.  This course is open to students who have completed GE 10101 (with permission) or GE 10111, or the equivalent.

GE 10200 -- The Grand Tour: Travel as Practical Education Part 2
During this seminar, you will retrace the steps of some of these visitors to Rome, visit some of the most important churches, museums, palaces, and archaeological sites featured on every Grand Tour itinerary, read some of the accounts of the experiences of these young aristocrats and study how the Tour shaped them and their culture when they returned home and began to commission and sometimes even create works that were inspired by their travels. While the course will be conducted during the time in Rome, the course work will be completed upon return to campus in Fall 2017.

GE 10311- Intensive German I
This course is intended for any student who wishes to develop German skills rapidly and be immersed in the language on a daily basis. Students will develop skills in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing German and will also attain a grasp of the basic structures of the language. During class, emphasis will be placed on using the language to communicate and interact in a variety of situations and contexts. In addition, there will be a comprehensive introduction to the culture of German-speaking countries. Upon completion of this course plus GE 10312 – Intensive German II, students will have fulfilled the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters.  

GE 10312- Intensive German II
This course is intended for any student who wishes to develop German skills rapidly and be immersed in the language on a daily basis. Students will develop skills in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing German and will also attain a grasp of the basic structures of the language. During class, emphasis will be placed on using the language to communicate and interact in a variety of situations and contexts. In addition, there will be a comprehensive introduction to the culture of German-speaking countries. Upon completion of this course plus GE 10311 – Intensive German I, students will have fulfilled the language requirement of the College of Arts and Letters.

GE 13186 – Literature University Seminar
Topic varies by instructor.  See current course listings for description.

The Essay – the Development of a Genre from the 16th to the 20th century
One of the main tasks of college students is to write essays. What could benefit them more than to read some classic examples of this genre, which was created, in opposition to the large Summae of the Middle Ages, in the late 16th century by Michel de Montaigne? We will read several of his most fascinating essays, such as on sadness, on pedantry, on the education of children, on friendship, on cannibals, on solitude, on cruelty, on glory, on freedom of conscience, on repentance, on vanity, on physiognomy. We will then follow the further development of the genre in England (several essays by Francis Bacon as well as David Hume’s “On the Standard of Taste”) and end with some powerful German examples, such as Kant’s “What is Enlightenment” and Hans Jonas’s “The Burden and Blessing of Mortality”. All the topics will all engage freshmen, and much time will be set aside to discuss the issues from the point of view of the students, who will learn to articulate complex issues in short but elegant form.

GE 20113- German for the Business World
In this course, students will develop written and oral communication skills useful for the German business world. They will become acquainted with various aspects of German business culture and will examine key cultural differences in business practices. The course will include readings and discussions on Germany¿s role as a global and EU business player. 

GE 20201 – Intermediate German I
In this course, students will build on and develop their communicative abilities acquired in Beginning German I and II. The four-skills approach (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) is centered on authentic texts, recordings, videos, and other images. The course includes grammar review, concentrated vocabulary expansion, and intensive practice.

GE 20202 – Intermediate German II
In this bridge course, students will strengthen and refine the four linguistic skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing). Students will work toward greater fluency, accuracy, and complexity of expression. They will debate, analyze, and express opinions. Materials and class discussions will center on a cultural topic that will carry through the entire semester.

GE 20211 - Intensive Intermediate German I
This course provides comprehensive training in all the communicative language skills, speaking, reading, writing, and listening, as well as cultural competence. Students will work with authentic texts, recordings, videos, and other images. During class, emphasis will be placed on using the language to communicate and interact in a variety of situations and contexts. The course includes grammar review, concentrated vocabulary expansion, and intensive practice. This course is strongly recommended for students who wish to study abroad in a German speaking country and for any student who wishes to progress rapidly in the ability to communicate in the German language. 

GE 20212 - Intensive Intermediate German II
This course provides comprehensive training in all language skills, speaking, reading, writing, and listening, with the goal of greater fluency, accuracy, and complexity of expression. Students will read and discuss selected cultural and literary texts with an emphasis on the period between 1945 and the present. They will review grammar in the context of situations and readings, become acquainted with Austrian and German culture and history, employ typical conversational strategies and gambits, sharpen listening skills, produce various types of written expression, and enlarge their active and passive vocabulary. This course is designed to prepare students with some previous study of German for study abroad in Innsbruck or Berlin. It is also recommended for any student who wishes to make more rapid progress in German language skills and cultural competence. 

GE 20301 - Introduction to Linguistics
This course emphasizes language structure, including phonetics (the sounds of language), phonology (the sound systems of language), morphology and lexicon (structured meanings in words), morphemes (units of meaning), syntax, and semantics. 

GE 20320 Pre-study Abroad in Germany
This mini-course will prepare students accepted for study abroad in the AJY Heidelberg program and the BCGS Berlin Program for living and studying in Germany. Topics for discussion will include practical aspects of everyday life, handling cultural differences, adjusting to the academic system, optimizing academic opportunities, culture with a small and capital C, making the most of travel, and possibilities for post-study abroad internships, fellowships, research projects and other opportunities for returning to the German-speaking world. This is a one credit course and is graded S/U.

GE 20420 Marx, Nietzsche, Freud
 

GE 24210 - Readings in German Cultural History
Small homogeneous group-intensive drill on German language, structure, and vocabulary. 

GE 24216 - Doing Christian Theology Today
The aim of this course is to provide students with an introduction to Christian theology in the Catholic tradition for our modern day. For a religion that bases itself on a divine revelation, it is essential to clarify the central importance of revelation and inspiration on the one hand, and show adequate hermeneutics and ways of interpreting revelation on the other hand. One hermeneutical instrument is "Dramatic Theology," which draws on literary drama as a model for the interpretation of the history of revelation and Scripture. After introducing this model we will put it to use in analyzing THE Christian event of salvation: Jesus of Nazareth's in-carnation, life, death and resurrection. This event is the center and nexus of Christian theology. From here we can reach out to other main themes of it: Christology, Trinity, creation, anthropology, Church and sacraments, eschatology, ethics. These will be considered with reference to theology's difficult role within modernity's understanding of academia and society. In the process students will also get a good look at schools of theology that originated in Innsbruck (esp. K. Rahner and DramaticTheology) but found world-wide recognition. Thus to look at theology locally will make for helpful theological tools globally. 

GE 24231 - Intermediate Grammar Conversation/Tutorial
This course has been conceived for those Notre Dame students who after the one-year intensive course at ND and the summer course in Salzburg would like an intensive review of German grammar, vocabulary, and oral and written expression. A major part of the first semester is, therefore, devoted to grammar review. Furthermore we read texts that familiarize the students with various aspects of life in Austria. Through newspaper texts, video tapes (e.g., TV news), and audio texts, both active and passive mastering of the language will be intensified. Regular homework and vocabulary tests (plus midterm and final exams) should enable the students to keep track of their progress. The remaining class time is taken up by practical information on the linguistic handling of everyday life and the reading and discussing of modern German short stories. The overall goal of the class is to enable the students of the Innsbruck Program to handle their life as "insiders of the German/Austrian language" in Innsbruck as efficiently as possible. 

GE 24233 - Advanced Reading, Conversation/Tutorial
The main goal is to practice, expand, and make fluent the students' intermediate German skills by way of reading, writing, and conversing on an advanced level. In order to obtain and keep a fairly homogenous advanced level in the class, students are expected to have solid knowledge of the basic grammatical structures and a working knowledge of about 2,000 words at the beginning of the course. 

GE 24250 - Advanced Intensive Oral German
Advanced small homogeneous group-intensive drill on German language, structure, and vocabulary. 

GE 24295 - Berlin Theatre Experience
This course will be an intensive introduction to, and immersion in, German theater through attendance at the annual Berlin Theatertreffen, which is a juried festival that brings together the best German theater productions of the preceding year. The festival takes place annually in early to mid-May. The course will be structured around the plays presented at the festival (schedule usually announced in early spring). As part of the course, students will read English translations of each play before they see the production and discuss the play's themes and ideas ,the staging challenges presented by the text, and the meaning of the play within its social context (i.e., Germany 2005). While the course will initially be centered on the Theatertreffen, once the festival is over we will shift our attention to Berlin "fringe" and experimental theater, and attend performances at spaces like the Vaganten-Buhne, the Maxim-Gorki Theater, and the Hebbel am Ufer, among others, to see German experiments in multimedia and interdisciplinary performance. The theatre Immersion course will last a total of three weeks; it will involve regular class meetings, regular attendance at the theater, and post-show discussions. In addition, students will tour one or two theatres and have the opportunity to meet and talk with local theatre artists. The course will involve a total of 35 contact hours for 3 credits. This will be an oral-intensive course, similar to the college seminar. Students will be expected to fully participate in discussions, including the post-show gatherings. In addition, each student will be required to facilitate class discussion, as well as give an oral presentation on one of the plays or directors. Students will also be expected to keep a daily journal recording both their impressions of the theatre they have seen and their reflections on class discussions.

GE 24563 - History of European Arts
This course aims to make the development of painting in the past 2000 years comprehensively intelligible and also to impart as concrete an understanding as possible, thus enabling participants to make rough classifications and assessments in the course of future encounters with originals. Following the introductory section dealing with the nature of picture on an anthropological basis, the history of painting will be followed chronologically from late antiquity/the early Christian period up to the present. Both the change in content and the change in form will be dealt with equally. Parallel to this, the history of art theory and aestheticism will be treated as a philosophical background. The other fields of art (architecture, sculpture, decorative arts, etc.) and the historical complex (political, socioeconomic and scientific development) are introduced exemplarity within the context. In order to prevent the History of Painting being linked solely with the reproductions shown brief excursions will be held to enable contact with originals from the respective period. 

GE 30102 - The ABCs of Reading and Writing about Literature (in German)
At most, two works will be read: Durrenmatt's Der Richter und sein Henker and Der Besuch der alten Dame. We will read these carefully, with great attention to detail. Writing assignments will evolve from the readings; they may include a character portrayal, the description of an outdoor event, a short conversation, description of a crime scene, etc. They will increase in length from a single paragraph to two or three pages.

GE 30103 - Advanced German Conversation
This is an advanced German language course, designed for students who have successfully completed a minimum of four semesters of German. This course expands on the grammatical structures of the German language spoken in German-speaking countries today, with emphasis on communication and acquisition of advanced language skills: reading and listening comprehension, and oral and written expression. A study of everyday German culture supports the language study. The conversational component of the course requires student-teacher and student-student interaction (in large and small group settings) to exchange information, clarify meanings, express opinions, argue points of view, and engage in any other communicative function for which native speakers use language. The course includes ongoing evaluation of students, using a variety of evaluative instruments and communicative contexts. Note: Native speakers or students who already have achieved a high level of oral proficiency (to be determined by an oral proficiency interview with the instructor) will not be given credit for this course. 

GE 30104 – Advanced Composition and Conversation
This course is designed for students who have successfully completed four semesters of German language.  This course expands on grammatical structures and offers students the opportunity to increase the sophistication of their written and oral German.  A study of everyday German culture supports the language study.  Writing assignments are varied widely to address the interests and strengths of all students and to allow many opportunities for creativity through the exploration of genres and writing styles.  The conversational component requires student-teacher and student-student interaction in large and small group settings to exchange information, clarify meanings, express opinions, and argue points of view.  Throughout the semester students will build their vocabulary, including idiomatic expression, and solidify their understanding of German grammar. (Note: Berlin Study Abroad returnees will be admitted to the course only with the permission of the instructor.)

GE 30106 – The Face(s) of Germany
The dismantling of the border between the two German states not only changed the German landscape but also disrupted the silence regarding concepts of national identity in Germany. This course examines the cultural constructions of nation and identity in Germany, beginning with the French Revolution and continuing to today. The subjects we examine include essays, poetry, short stories, films, architecture, and painting, facilitating classroom discussions on the intersecting discourses of geography, religion, gender, ethnicity, and nationality and their iinfluence on German identity.

GE 30107 - Kulturgeschichte
This course offers a survey of major developments in the cultural history of Germany and Central Europe. The course will investigate different manifestations of German and Central European cultures, such as literature, painting, architecture, music, and philosophy, as well as their interrelationship and historical contextualization. The course will provide an overview of important cultural and historical developments that have shaped German-speaking Europe. The goal is to familiarize students with basic techniques of approaching and interpreting texts and artifacts while preparing them for a wider range of more specialized courses. Taught in German.

GE 30108 - Literatur von gestern und heute
This course acquaints students with the major periods and issues of German literature through the examination of a significant constellation of literary texts. Students read, discuss, and analyze selected texts from prose, poetry, and drama and become familiar with basic techniques of approaching and interpreting texts that will prepare them for a wider range of more specialized courses.

GE 30112 - Germany and the Environment
Germany is globally recognized as a leader in the fields of renewable energy, sustainable development, and environmental protection. But how did this come about? In this course, we will examine the roles that culture and history play in shaping human attitudes towards the environment. Our case studies will range over two centuries, from damming projects in the Rhine valley at the start of the nineteenth century to the Chernobyl nuclear disaster at the end of the twentieth. We will study novels, films, and philosophical essays alongside works by leading environmental historians. Over the course of the semester, students will develop a richer understanding of German environmentalism that also includes an awareness of its dark sides, such as the role that nature conservancy played within Nazi ideology.

GE 30113 - Business German
German business language and practices. Designed to introduce the internationally oriented business and German major to the language, customs, and practices of the German business world. 

GE 30204 – Introduction to German Literature and Culture
This course offers an overview of major developments in the literary and cultural history of German-speaking Europe. The course explores significant figures and works of literature, the visual arts, music, and philosophy as well as their interrelationship and historical contextualization. Students read, discuss, and analyze selected texts representing all genres—prose, poetry, and drama—and become familiar with fundamental techniques of approaching and interpreting works that also prepare them for advanced courses.

GE 30210 - Love, Crime and Redemption in German Opera
Passionate love and gruesome crime, heroic sacrifice and a yearning for redemption - German opera has it all. Starting with one of the most beloved works in the history of opera, Mozart's/ Schikaneder's "Die Zauberflöte", this class will explore the wondrous worlds of late 18th up to 20th-Century German opera and their cultural-historical dimensions. We will discuss works such as Beethoven's/ von Sonnleithner's "Fidelio", Richard Wagner's "Parsifal", Richard Strauss'/ Hedwig Lachmann's "Salomé", Alban Berg's "Wozzeck" or Hans Werner Henze's/ Ingeborg Bachmann's "Der Prinz von Homburg", raising questions about opera's fraught relationship with religion and with politics, about the history of operatic performances and the fate of women in German opera. Students will become familiar with famous works of the German literary tradition, like Wolfram von Eschenbach's "Parzival", Heinrich von Kleist's "Prinz Friedrich von Homburg", or Georg Büchner's "Woyzeck." While you should be open to engage with new auditory and theatrical experiences, previous knowledge about classical music is not a requirement for this class. (This class will be taught in German, assigned readings will be both in English and German.) 

GE 30215 - Medieval German Literature
This course constitutes a survey of German literature from its beginnings during Germanic times until the 16th century. Ideas, issues, and topics are discussed in such a way that their continuity can be seen throughout the centuries. Lectures and discussions are in German, but individual students' language abilities are taken into consideration. Readings include modern German selections from major medieval authors and works such as Hildebrandslied, Rolandslied, Nibelungenlied, Iwein, Parzival, Tristan, courtly lyric poetry, the German mystics, secular and religious medieval drama, Der Ackermann aus Bohmen, and the beast epic Reineke Fuchs. Class discussions and brief presentations in German by students on the selections are intended as an opportunity for stimulating exchange and formal use of German. 

GE 30304 - German Literary and Cultural Tradition(s)
Cannot have taken GE30204

GE 30305 - Contemporary German
Cannot have taken GE30104

GE 30310 - Art as Protest
This class treats film and literature as interventions in (and reflections upon) conditions of political conflict and repression. Topics include the plight of art, the artist, and ordinary citizens inthe German Democratic Republic, the Nazi period, and in other authoritarian conditions (including issues related to the 1968 Student Movement). Short forms of prose, poetry and documentation; all films in German original with English subtitles.

GE 30352- A History of Christianity in the Era of Reformations
This course will examine the social, cultural, political, an intellectual history of Christianity from the late fifteenth century through the end of the Thirty Years War (1648). It will focus on the religious change and conflict which (together with overseas expansion) defined the early modern period of European history.  Students will engage with the people, ideas, events, and broader forces that shaped this watershed and liminal era. Particular attention will be paid to figures such as Desiderius Erasmus, Martin Luther, Ulrich Zwingli, Melchior Hoffman, Thomas Cranmer, John Calvin, Ignatius Loyola, and François de Sales. We will also cover Europe’s religious wars, the spread of Christianity to Asia and the New World, and the rise of political absolutism.

GE 30460 - Habsburg Empire 1740-1918
Catholic Great Power. Medieval Holdover. Sick Man on the Danube. Prison of the Peoples. Laboratory of the Apocalypse. The Habsburg Empire has been called many things, but I bet you never have heard of it. But I bet you have heard about the Austrian Archduke, Franz Ferdinand, whose assassination sparked the outbreak of the First World War; or maybe your parents made you listen to Mozart as a child in the hopes that you¿d be brilliant. What you probably don¿t know, because historians have generally forgotten it, is that the Habsburg Monarchy stood at the center of Europe and European politics and culture for nearly four hundred years. Germans, Croatians, Slovenes, Poles, Jews, Czechs, Slovaks, Serbs, Bosnians, Romanians, Italians, Ukrainians and (last but not least) Hungarians all played a role in the longevity and vibrancy of this multinational Empire. In this course, we will explore the history of this great continental empire from its modern origins during the reign of Maria Theresia (1740-1780) to its collapse and dismemberment in the First World War. In the process we will learn much about the history of Europe itself and about what becomes common knowledge and what does not. Our topics will include Enlightened Absolutism, the French Revolution, Liberalism, German Unification, Music and Culture, modernity, economic development, Jewish emancipation and identity, and finally the First World War. 

GE 30464- German History, 1740-1870
This course begins with Prussia's initial challenge to Austria's dominance in central Europe; it ends with the unification of Germany under Bismarck's Prussia--and Austria's exclusion from it. In addition to covering the on-going Austro-Prussian rivalry in Germany, the course will consider German History in a broad central European perspective that covers the variety of what was German-speaking Europe. We will cover the cultural, social, and political transformations of the period. Specific topics may include Enlightened Absolutism and the emergence of the 'enlightened' police state, the influence of the French Revolution in the German-speaking lands, as well as the revolutions of 1848 and the struggle for German Unification. Additionally, we will cover larger long term processes such as the emergence of civil society, political transformations such as the growth of German Liberalism and Nationalism and the emergence of Socialism, and German contributions to larger cultural and intellectual fields such as the Enlightenment and Romanticism. 

GE 30465 - Modern Germany Since 1871
This course examines modern Germany from national unification in 1871 to the recent unification of the two Germanies and beyond. We will investigate cultural, political, and social dimensions of Germany's dynamic role in Europe and in the world. Topics include Bismarck and the founding of the Second Reich, World War I and the legacy of defeat, challenge and authority in the Weimar Republic, the National Socialist revolution, war and Holocaust, collapse of the Third Reich, conflict and accommodation in East and West Germany, and unification and its aftermath. Class format will combine lectures with discussion of readings from political, social, literary, and diplomatic sources.

GE 30466 - History of the Third Reich
Why did Nazism emerge in Germany in the 1920s? How did the Nazi Party climb to power? Did the Nazis lead a ¿revolution¿ in Germany after 1933? Why did the Third Reich become embroiled in a world war? What role did the Holocaust play in Nazi Germany¿s pursuit of its ideology, before and during the war? What led to the Third Reich¿s downfall? This lecture course is for students interested in studying the history of Germany during one of its darkest eras. Beginning in 1918 and ending in 1945, the course will explore various topics over the course of the semester, including (but not limited to) the impact of the First World War and the Treaty of Versailles on Germany; the program of the Nazi Party and its attempts to take power through violence; the ascent of Hitler and the collapse of the Weimar Republic; the ¿coordination¿ of German society with Nazism; economic recovery and military rearmament up to 1939; the main tenets of Nazi ideology, particularly with regards to living space, race, war, and women and the family; the complicated relationship between the Christian churches and the regime; discrimination and persecution of ¿undesirables,¿ especially Jews, in Germany before the war; the outbreak of war in 1939; Nazi-occupied Europe; the war on the Eastern Front; the genocide of Europe¿s Jews; and Nazi Germany¿s total defeat in 1945, culminating with Hitler¿s suicide and unconditional surrender to the Allied forces. This course is meant to be an introduction to the topic, and as such there are no set prerequisites, though students with a background in modern European history will have a slight advantage when we start. There will be prolific use of primary documents throughout the semester (in translation; no knowledge of German necessary).

GE 30467 - The City of German Destiny; History and Memory in Berlin 1910-2010
Germany has stood at the center of many events during the twentieth century, from participating in one world war, instigating another, providing the threshold between east and west during the cold war, and then emerging at the end of the century as the third strongest economic power in the world, and the strongest on the European continent. How does Germany as a nation composed of individuals come together to confront its past, present and future? Historically, what forms of memorialization and commemoration has this confrontation taken? This course proposes to explore these questions and others by examining twentieth century Berlin, the capital city of Germany. Berlin presents a rich and varied memoryscape in which to investigate and scrutinize the role of history and memory in Germany, and the ways in which history and memory are represented, debated, contested, and transformed. As both the political and cultural capital of united Germany, and a literal symbol of divided Germany from 1945 to 1990, Berlin is a city overrun with versions of its past that simultaneously compete with and complement each other. This course challenges students to think about and understand how a nation comes together to deal with its past, and what lessons can be drawn from the moments when that nation fails to consider that past. 

GE 30555 - European Revolutions of 1848
This course will introduce students to the major revolutions which occurred throughout continental Europe in 1848. In addition to covering the details of rapidly evolving events, we will look at long-term social and political roots of the revolution as well as the role of ideologies (socialism, nationalism, liberalism) in shaping actions taken (and subsequent interpretations of those actions). Finally, we will ask not only why these revolutions failed, but what makes them "European" - other than the accident of geography. This course will combine lecture and discussion in roughly equal measure. Readings for this course will include a textbook as well as primary source material including parliamentary speeches and constitutional documents, eyewitness reports, poetry, music, as well as literature. 

GE 30565 – The German Novella
This course will explore the German Novella, one of the most popular genres of 19th-century German literature. Each work will be read and discussed with careful attention to its formal characteristics as well as its historical and cultural contexts. By proceeding chronologically through the literary periods of Romanticism, Biedermeier, Poetic Realism, and Naturalism, students will gain a sense of literary developments in the 19th century and how these reflect shifts within the broader culture. Among the writers to be read: Goethe, Tieck, Kleist, Hoffmann, Eichendorff, Stifter, Storm, Keller and Hauptmann. As a 30000-level course, writing will be emphasized. Students will be required to rewrite each of their essays.

GE 30635 – National Theatre: Contemporary Europe
This course provides students with insight into the development of European theatre, from Brecht-Weigel’s work at the Berliner Ensemble to the theatre works of Giorgio Strehler at the Piccolo (Italy), Peter Brook at the Buffes de Nord (UK, France), Ariane Mnouchkine at Theatre de Soleil (France), Peter Stein at the Schaubuehne, Pina Bausch at Tanztheater Wuppertal, and Heiner Mueller and Einar Schleef at the Volksbuehne and the Berlin Ensemble (Germany). Students are introduced to the main productions of these directors, their theatrical roots, and their influence on contemporary European theater and playwriting.

GE 30648 - Masterpieces of German Cinema
German cinema has been from the start one of the most impressive, distinctive, and influential national traditions of cinema. This course, taught in English, will introduce students to some of the greatest works of German cinema, from the wake of World War I and the beginning of the Weimar Republic to the present day. The two-fold focus will be historical and aesthetic. Students will gain an appreciation of some of the fascinating complexities of German history, including the ways in which German films have tended to reflect contemporary issues, often indirectly, and some of the distinctive features of German film, also as an industry. In addition, we will interpret the films with appropriate attention not only to themes but also to the ways in which film as an art form expresses meaning indirectly, by integrating genre and narrative form as well as film-specific dimensions such as setting, lighting, sound, camera work, and editing.

GE 30650 – The Romantic Tradition
Between 1790 and 1830, the movement known as Romanticism profoundly changed the artistic, musical, historical, religious, and political sensibilities on the Continent and in Britain. Romanticism marked a turn from the rational formalism of the classical period and reawakened an interest in myth, religious faith, the imagination, and emotional experience. In this course we will focus principally on the German contribution to Romanticism and trace its origins, development, and eventual decline in works of literature, philosophy, theology, music, painting, and architecture. Works to be studied will include those by the writers Ludwig Tieck, Friedrich von Hardenberg (Novalis), and Friedrich Schlegel; the philosophers Fichte and Schelling; the theologian Friedrich Schleiermacher; the painters Caspar David Friedrich and some members of the Nazarene school; the composers Franz Schubert, Felix Mendelssohn, and Robert Schumann; and the architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel.

GE 30685 - Discourses of Unity or Disunity? Representing Germany after 1990
The fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 brought the hope of unity to two diverse German traditions. Yet despite rapid political and geographical unification, even now, more than 15 years later, Germany seems in many respects more dis-unified than ever. In this course we will examine the unity discourse in contemporary German film and text. Focusing in particular on current depictions of the former East and West, we will consider whether these representations contribute to a new sense to national unity by emphasizing the similarities in a common past and present, or whether in fact they accentuate a sense of disunity by bringing out areas of difference, divergence and even conflict. The course will facilitate exploratons of the literary, cultural and historical impact of (dis)unity in present-day Germany through intensive discussion, written essays, and short student-led presentations. 

GE 31465 - Modern Germany LAC Lab
Students undertaking the Notre Dame language requirement in German are eligible to sign up for an additional single credit discussion section as part of the Languages Across the Curriculum (LAC) initiative of the College of Arts and Letters. Choosing this option means that students will do some additional reading in German language materials and meet regularly with the instructor (or a designate) for a discussion in German. The LAC discussion section in German associated with this course will be graded on a pass/fail basis and will be credited on the student's transcript. Up to three LAC discussion sections can be applied toward a major, secondary major or minor in German. Please contact the instructor if you are interested in adding this supplemental credit.

GE 31466 - History of the Third Reich LAC Lab
Students undertaking the Notre Dame language requirement in German are eligible to sign up for an additional single credit discussion section as part of the Languages Across the Curriculum (LAC) initiative of the College of Arts and Letters. Choosing this option means that students will do some additional reading in German language materials and meet regularly with the instructor (or a designate) for a discussion in German. Up to three LAC discussion sections can be applied toward a major, secondary major or minor in German.

GE 31467 - History and Memory in Berlin LAC Lab
Students undertaking the Notre Dame language requirement in German are eligible to sign up for an additional single credit discussion section as part of the Languages Across the Curriculum (LAC) initiative of the College of Arts and Letters. Choosing this option means that students will do some additional reading in German language materials and meet regularly with the instructor (or a designate) for a discussion in German. The LAC discussion section in German associated with this course will be graded on a pass/fail basis and will be credited on the student's transcript. Up to three LAC discussion sections can be applied toward a major, secondary major or minor in German. Please contact the instructor if you are interested in adding this supplemental credit.

GE 31648 - Masterpieces of German Cinema Lab
Certain films will be viewed for further discussion in class.

GE 32301 – German Reading Group
This one-credit (satisfactory/unsatisfactory) reading course is designed to introduce students who have the equivalent of four-semesters or more of college German, that is, the equivalent of German 20202 or more, to an interesting work in German and to help them continue to develop their reading skills as well as their pronunciation. The language of discussion will be English, thus opening the course to a wide range of students, undergraduate as well as graduate.  The spring 2015 topic is Joseph Roth’s Hiob. Roman eines einfachen Mannes (1930). Past topics have included Heinrich Heine’s Zur Geschichte der Religion und Philosophie in Deutschland (1834).

GE 32302 - Conversational German
This course is designed to teach practical and useful German conversation for everyday life. Learn how to navigate situations such as ordering a beer, shopping for food, buying concert tickets, introducing yourself to your roommate in Berlin, negotiating with a landlord, or just everyday conversational skills. We´ll invite native speakers of German from all over campus to talk about Germany, Austria, Switzerland; political and cultural issues; as well as topics concering business and economics. We´ll watch German news and discuss current events, such as the recent European refugee crisis. All levels welcome, see instructor with any concerns or questions

GE 33000 - Exploring Int'l Economics
In this special course designed for inquisitive international economics / romance language majors, students will attend a number of lectures, panels, and seminars on campus during the semester, with a follow-up discussion for each led by either a visitor or a member of the economics or romance languages faculty. Before each session, students will be expected to complete a short reading assignment. At each follow-up session, the students will submit a 1-2 page summary and analysis of the talk, with a critical question for discussion. The goal is to encourage students to enrich their major experience by participating in the intellectual discussions that occur amongst ND and visiting scholars across the campus, distinguished alumni, and professionals in the field.

GE 33411 - Berlin SONAR: Architecture and Design in Contemporary Germany
Experience firsthand a fascinating city and its art and architecture. Convey your impressions into a project of your own style. All students will visit Berlin over Spring Break!

GE 34011 - The German Democratic Republic
Taught at a host institution. Nostalgia? Nostalgia of the former East (Ostalgie)? Social Paradise? Unjust regime? Dictatorship? Failed socialism: the critical views of the GDR are very contradictory. This seminar gives an overarching look at the founding and political development of the GDR, its cultural and educational policy and the typical life of its citizens. We will be focusing in particular on the upbringing of children in a socialist society as well as the youth culture. The GDR¿s various repressive methods and the roll of the Stasi in controlling the population will also be discussed. The use of academic and literary texts will be used in our analysis. During the semester, there will be two excursions. One will take us to the Stasi Museum where we will talk with a witness of the brutality of the Stasi. The second will take place in the classroom and will be led by the author of one of our required texts.

GE 34012 - Seeing Green: Cultural History of Environmentalism in Germany
Taught at a host institution. Fukushima. Chancellor Merkel¿s coalition government resolves to abandon nuclear energy entirely, while the Green Party enjoys an unprecedented wave of electoral successes. In the United States, by contrast, President Obama re-confirms the nation¿s commitment to building new reactors, while prominent GOP presidential candidates call into question climate science and the theory of evolution. How can we explain such profound cultural differences between two allied nations? In this course we will plunge into the history of environmentalism in Germany, taking up topics such as Waldromantik (forest romanticism), Naturphilosophie, Nazi ¿environmentalism,¿ the environmental movement in East and West Germany, the Green Party, Waldsterben (acid rain and the ¿death¿ of the forests), Chernobyl and Fukushima. We will encounter key environmentalist thinkers, writers and artists: Goethe, Linnaeus, Alexander von Humboldt, Erich Haeckel, Jakob von Uexküll, Hanns Cibulka, Christa Wolf, and Werner Herzog. A BCGS visit to Weimar will allow us to explore the ¿environmental politics¿ of Goethe and possibly visit the Ernst Haeckel Museum in nearby Jena. We will also discuss sustainability with representatives from the Green Party, local government and the alternative energy industry.

GE 34083 - History of Modern Berlin: From 1815 to the Present
Taught as 'History of Modern Berlin: From 1815 to the Present' at a host insitution. A history of Berlin focusing on the period from 1815 to the present. The course examines changes in the economic structure, social development and technical history of Berlin. Topics covered include Berlin as a cultural center in literature, the fine arts, cabaret, and theater as well as urban planning and the division and unification of a modern city. Particular attention is paid to the periods of reunification and the postwar period.

GE 34093 - Berlin and Europe
Taught as 'Berlin und Europa' at a host institution. Chronologically, this course begins in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, just as Berlin was beginning to appear regularly in the historical record, and ends with Berlin becoming a national capital at the close of the 19th century. Rather than simply addressing the narrative of the city's rise to prominence, however, this course will aim to introduce students to the history of Berlin by considering the city within its broader European context. We will read a wide range of sources that will help us compare and contrast Berlin to other cities in Germany and the rest of Europe during the period from the 15th to the 19th century. We will also take advantage of the many cultural resources that the modern city of Berlin has to offer, in order to gain a variety of different perspectives on the city's unique history.

GE 34102 - The ABC's of Reading/Writing
This unit develops students' proficiency in advanced German speaking and writing. Its focus is on particular aspects of language study such as translation of a variety of different texts, vocabulary and syntax of German used in specific professional contexts and the rules governing colloquial German. The unit is based on authentic texts, both written and spoken, and deepens students' understanding of advanced German.

GE 34104 - Written Communication and Expression
This course focuses specifically on developing students' writing skills. Emphasis is placed on strengthening accuracy, appropriateness and clarity of written expression in German as needed in both academic and non-academic environments.

GE 34111 - Ludwig Wittgenstein: Philosophical Inquiries
Von allen Teilnehmerinnen und Teilnehmern des Seminars wird erwartet, dass sie an einem Vorbereitungsteam mitarbeiten (aktive Teilnahme). Die Vorbereitungsteams begleiten das Seminar jeweils zu thematischen Einheiten zwei Wochen lang. Sie geben jeweils vor, was diskutiert werden soll. Dazu bereiten sie für jede Sitzung ein kurzes Papier vor, auf dem sie wesentliche Punkte für die Diskussion notieren. Diese Papiere sollen auch dazu dienen, dass inhaltliche Fragen kontinuierlich verfolgt werden.

GE 34112 - Berlin Im Film
Taught as S16842 - 'Berlin Im Film' at a host institution. Since the early days of film, Berlin has played not only an important role as a production area for cinematography, but the city itself has become the subject of numerous films and theater productions.  In this respect, the history of Berlin has been represented by exemplary films that show Berlin in its most important stages. Here, Berlin films do more than just contribute to the city's history.  Berlin has been a hotbed for social and political developments in Germany overall; a place where the most important phases of German history in the 20th century can very well illustrate.

GE 34113 - German Art and Architecture in the 20th Century: 1933 to the Present
Taught as 'German Art and Architecture in the 20th Century: 1933 to the Present' at a host institution. Survey and analysis of the most important trends in German art and architecture from the Third Reich to the present, presented within their respective historical contexts with special emphasis on the role of Berlin in this epoch of big changes and famous artists. Topics include intellectual, political and social aspects: art and architecture under National Socialism; division of the development of German art after 1945: GDR: Stalinism, Socialist Realism, and the later liberalization movement; FRG: abstraction, realism, and other concepts and tendencies of Western Modernism; phases of urban reconstruction in the East; international building exhibitions in West-Berlin (1957, 1987); art and architecture after German reunification ¿ searching for identity in Germany; Berlin as the new capital of Germany: the face of the city at the turn of the century.

GE 34210 - Opera and Culture
This course explores relationships between opera and cultural practice, using examples from the German and Italian repertories from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. Lectures/discussions will examine operatic representations of major cultural discourses, such as the transition from absolutist monarchies to nation states, evolving constructions of gender and sexuality, politics and national identity, imperialism and orientalism, madness and/or disease. Since opera involves musical representation of these topics, we will also devote considerable attention to the formal structures within which these discourses are expressed.

GE 34211 - Film in the GDR
Die Entwicklung des gesellschaftlichen und politischen Lebens in der DDR soll in diesem Seminar anhand einer Reihe von wichtigen DDR-Filmen von den Anfängen bis zum Ende der DDR behandelt werden. Dazu zählen Filme wie "Die Mörder sind unter uns", "Berlin Ecke Schönhauser", "Die Spur der Steine", "Die Legende von Paul und Paula", "Solo Sunny", "Flüstern und Schreien" "Coming Out", "Die Architekten" u.a. Da die Filmproduktion in der DDR strenger kulturpolitischer Reglementierung und staatlicher Zensur unterlag, sollen im Seminar gleichzeitig diese politischen Rahmenbedingungen mitreflektiert werden.

GE 34212 - The Fairytales of the Brothers Grimm
Taught at a host institution. The book known as the Kinder- und Hausmärchen, collected and edited by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, is, along with Luther¿s Bible translation, certainly among the best known German books in the world. To date, this book has been translated into over 160 languages. Despite or thanks to their publication, the fairy tales have continued to lead a lively cultural existence. Unlike any other genre, they have been subject to frequent literary and cinematic adaptation. They have offered writers, filmmakers and dramatists innumerable and vital intertextual motifs. Visual artists have also responded intermedially, especially in the form of illustrated volumes of the tales. By the same token, scholars have approached fairy and folk tales from a great variety of perspectives: structuralist, narratological, ethnological, psychological, discourse-analytical and gender-studiesrelated. The seminar introduces students to the cultural-historical context of German Romanticism. Students will engage intensely with individual fairy tales as well as with paradigmatic interpretations. Students will engage with a wide variety of fairy tale adaptations analytically and comparatively. Last but not least, the seminar will offer students an opportunity to engage creatively with fairy tales. Students will be given short, pedagogically informed assignments involving short essays, responses, reviews, creative writing exercises, and adaptations. All of these assignments will be coordinated with the BCGS language tutoring program and will contribute directly to students¿ continued language learning.

GE 34213 - The Power of Money: Theory and Practice of Central Bank Money in the Euro Zone
Taught as 'The Power of Money: Theory and Practice of Central Bank Money in the Euro Zone' at a host institution. In this course, we will analyze the process of creating money supply policies aimed at stabilizing the currency within the Euro system. Our analysis will look at issues both on the scale of the national economies, as well as issues at the level of the Euro-system¿s integration into the broader world economy. We will be especially concerned with the institutional fundamentals of successful money supply policies and the integration of monetary realities into the overall equilibrium of the economy. In addition, we will be looking at empirical existing instruments, methods and problems of monetary policy within an economical con-text.

GE 34280 - The Roots of Reason
From nature to culture: this course takes the student on a voyage of discovery: to discover the roots of Western civilization and thought, the basic beliefs about human life and destiny which were embodied in myths, legends and customs and which later emerged implicitly and explicitly in literature, philosophy and science. Why think? How and why did humans evolve the capacity for rational thought? How did our Western way of thinking develop from its roots? How can we better comprehend the structure of our ways of seeing, conceiving, and judging the world from our understanding of the history of mind and its rationality? What dangers and chances do our ways of thinking, reflecting and assessing involve ? and how can we find ways of enriching our understanding in the service of the highest ideals found in our tradition? These fundamental issues demand historical and systematic investigation using the resources of the natural sciences (especially biology and psychology) and the arts, and thus require an interdisciplinary approach adequate to the richness, importance and complexity of the questions involved.

GE 34311 - Travel Literature: Africa
Die Reiseliteratur ist ein umfangreiches, heterogenes Genre, in dem sich z.B. Historiographie, Forschungsbericht, Journal intime, Reportage oder Belletristik vermengen können. In der europäischen Moderne hat vor allem die literarische Bearbeitung einer Reise-Erfahrung immer wieder Konjunktur. Um also das ganze Spektrum dieser Kategorien berücksichtigen zu können, bietet es sich an, statt vom Reisebericht vom Reisetext zu sprechen. Im Rahmen dieses Proseminars soll anhand des Beispiels "Afrika" sowohl die Entwicklung des Reisetextes in der europäischen Literatur- und Kulturgeschichte nachvollzogen als auch ein Einblick in die Vielfalt literarischer Bearbeitungen des Themas und seiner prominenten Motive gewährt werden. Unter anderem werden wir uns (wegen des Umfangs der Texte größtenteils in Ausschnitten) mit Mungo Parks Travels in the Interior Districts of Africa, Joseph Conrads Heart of Darkness, André Gides Voyage au Congo, Karen Blixens Out of Africa oder weniger populären Texten wie Richard Kandts Caput Nili beschäftigen. Zur Vorbereitung sei - für ein Verständnis der Kolonialgeschichte Afrikas - ein Blick in Basil Davidsons Africa in History. Themes and Outlines sowie in Gattungsgeschichten wie Peter J. Brenners Der Reisebericht in der Deutschen Literatur oder Barbara Kortes Der englische Reisebericht empfohlen.

GE 34313 - European Culture, Society and Politics
This course is designed to engage students with as many aspects of Europe's and Austria's culture in as many ways as possible by reading and hearing about it, by experiencing it firsthand through excursions and various cultural events, and naturally, by discussing it and writing about it. The main goal of these intellectual and practical experiences is to gain an extensive and deep understanding of Europeans, their way of life, their values and beliefs, their customs and traditions. The course will provide background information on various cultural and political issues and their historical background.

GE 34370 - Trends in Psychoanalysis
Taught in German. Psychoanalysis has become an unavoidable part of modern knowledge, with far-reaching effects on the thinking, behavior, literature, morals and aspirations of our era. Not only in the restricted sphere of mental health, but also in medicine and education, and extending into everyday human relations, the consequences of Freud's thought have been revolutionary. This course is an introduction to the psychoanalytic way of understanding the human person and the worlds of feelings and thought.

GE 34411 - The Berlin Fantastic
Diese Einführung soll ausländischen Studierenden aller Fächer einen Einblick in die Kulturgeschichte der Stadt und ihre gegenwärtige Kultursituation geben. Sie dient der besseren Orientierung in der Topographie und der Geschichte Berlins. Anhand von historischen und literarischen Texten sowie Filmdokumentationen soll ein Überblick über die wichtigsten Stationen der Berliner Kulturgeschichte erarbeitet werden, der sich von der Kaiserzeit über die Weimarer Republik, die Zeit des Nationalsozialismus, des "Kalten Kriegs" und der Teilung der Stadt über die Wiedervereinigung bis in die Gegenwart erstreckt. Neben der Geschichte der Hochkultur und ihrer Institutionen sollen dabei auch Aspekte der Architektur und Stadtentwicklung, der Mediengeschichte, der Alltags- und "Szene"-Kultur sowie der politischen und ideologischen Strömungen behandelt werden.

GE 34412 - Theory of Drag and Practices of Queer Performance
Taught at a host institution. This course offers an introduction to both the theory and practice of queer performance. It is offered through the Institute for Theater Studies. In the seminar we will read and discuss theories of queer and gender studies. Students will also be required to attend two live performances related to the classroom work.

GE 34413 - Intrigue in 17/18 C. Tragedies
Taught as 'Intrigue in 17/18 C. Tragedies' at a host institution. This course explores the role of intrigue in the works of 17th and 18th century German tragedy. During the semester, students will explore works by German authors such as Johann Christian Friedrich von Schiller, Gotthold Lessing, Andreas Gryphius and Daniel Casper von Lohenstein. Class discussion will be led by way of student presentations.

GE 34420 - The European Union
In this course students study the history of the European Union as a political system, an economic system, a policy making body, and it's role in moving toward integration of the the European states.

GE 34421 - European Politics in the 20th Century
The course European Politics in the 20th Century will focus on an introductory part and two main parts. The introduction will be a short outline of characteristics of contemporary Austrian politics. The first main part will be a discussion of characteristics of 20th Century European Historyespecially the developments after World War I, the rise of Fascism and Nazism and the theory and practice of Nazism. The second main part will focus on special aspects of political sciencedemocracy, political parties, election systems, conflicts and political culture, media systems, European Union, Europe at the end of the century and transformation processes. Part of the course is also a visit to Tiroler Tageszeitung, the widest spread regional daily in Tyrol.

GE 34430 - Topics in German Studies
Topics may include Masterpieces of German Literature, Nietzsche and Wagner, the Environment and Urban Cultures, Aesthetics and Intellectual History, Prague 1900-1945, Germany and its East European Neighbors. Announced at the beginning of the semester.

GE 34450 - Munich & National Socialism
This course traces the origins of National Socialism, the establishment of Munich as the administrative and symbolic center of the Nazi movement, and explores everyday life in Munich under the Nazi dictatorship. Includes visits to sites of historical significance in and around Munich, e.g. the Dachau concentration camp memorial, and Nürnberg (site of the 1934 Nazi Party rally and stage for Leni Riefenthal's Triumph des Willens).

GE 34469 - European/Austrian History and Civilization
Part I of this course offers a study of the Habsburg Empire and covers the period of 1500 and 1789. Symbolized by the imperial dignity, Austria's role as an epoch-making power is carefully analyzed within the boundaries of the Holy Roman Empire. Special emphasis is laid on the attempt to transform the Habsburg possessions into a modern, centralized state under the auspices of enlightened absolutism. Part II (1789-1918) analyzes: a) the stagnation of reform following the French Revolution, b) the Napoleonic Wars and the revolutions of 1830/1848, c) the attempt to cope with industrialization and the rise of growing nationalism, constitutionalism, and imperialism, d) the compromise with Hungary and the failure of the multinational empire, and e) the eventual breakup under the strain of WWI. It also offers a study of the paths taken by Austria from the collapse of the Habsburg Empire to the present stability of the small Austrian Republic as part of the European Union.

GE 34511 - City of Berlin in Literature
Anhand exemplarischer Texte sollen die wichtigsten Stationen der Stadtgeschichte vom Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts bis in die unmittelbare Gegenwart behandelt werden. Es soll untersucht werden, welchen Niederschlag die Entwicklung des politischen und kulturellen Lebens in der Stadt vom Kaiserreich über die Weimarer Republik, den Nationalsozialismus, die Teilung der Stadt und die Zeit nach der Wiedervereinigung in den literarischen Berlin-Bildern gefunden hat. Neben den "klassischen" Prosatexten werden dabei auch Lyrik und Drama sowie Beispiele aus der Kriminalliteratur berücksichtigt werden. Vorgesehen sind Texte von Th. Fontane, G. Hermann, F. Hessel, W. Benjamin, S. Kracauer, A. Döblin, E. Kästner, K. Tucholsky, A. Döblin, B. Brecht, Chr. Wolf, U. Johnson, P. Schneider, F. C. Delius, H. Müller, Th. Brasch, B. Morshäuser, P. Biermann, T. Dückers u.a.

GE 34771 - Eastern Enlargement of the European Union
On 1 May 2004, eight central and eastern European countries together with Cyprus and Malta joined the European Union (EU). The "Eastern Enlargement" was the EU's biggest enlargement ever in terms of scope and diversity. This course discusses the process of integration within the European Union and analyzes the Eastern Enlargement of the EU. We will start with a look at the historical evolution and the institutions of the EU. The main part of the course offers an extensive discussion of the pros and cons of the Eastern Enlargement: a) effects on the Common Agricultural Policy b) effects on the community budget c) effects on the migration of labor, etc. At the end of the course students should be in the position to discuss the costs and benefits of the Eastern Enlargement.

GE 34801 - US Perceptions of Germany and the Germans from Bismarck to Hitler
This course explores the role of national stereotypes in German-American relations in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In the session's first part, readings introduce basic sociocultural and economic history of Germany and German-American relations during these time periods. The second part closely examines the ways stereotypes may have helped to shape and justify American policies toward Germany.

GE 34802 - Berlin East-East-West
Today's Berlin is a nerve center with strong impulses from Russia, Ukraine, Turkey, Vietnam, India, and other Eastern countries. Through contemporary literature and film, we will explore Berlin's role in a globalized world: how Berliners resist, embrace, or simply describe the influx of people from Eastern countries; how West-Berliners have re-oriented themselves after the fall of the wall; how the majority adapts to the minorities; and how some migrant authors rework the German language by experimenting with translingual writing. By way of literary and filmic analysis, we will inquire if borders or limits can play a productive role; how the history of the divided city figures in the imaginary of immigrant authors; and how, for example, Turkish-German or Russian-German writers inscribe the tensions between East- and West-Germany into a larger discourse on East-West relations.

GE 34850 - German History through Literature: 800 - 1806
Parallel to studying the history of the Holy Roman Empire from its beginnings under Charlemagne in 800 A.D. to its demise under Napoleon in 1806 A.D, students will read, discuss, write, and lecture on literary texts illustrating, dealing with, or commenting on the major historical events during 1,000 years of European history. The course is also cross-listed with HIST 34320 and will count toward the History majors' requirements. There is no pre-requisite for this course.

GE 36100 - Directed Readings-German
Intensive study with a faculty member in the student's area of interest. Normally, only available to majors.

GE 40041 - Introduction to Applied Linguistics
This course will introduce students to the properties of language and their systematic study via linguistic inquiry. Specifically, the origins and mechanisms of linguistic knowledge will be examined alongside the componential units of syntax, morphology, phonology and semantics. The course will further introduce students to applied linguistic study with an emphasis on second language acquisition and the integration of sociocultural knowledge within this process. Students will complete this course with a greater understanding of the nature of language and the mechanisms whereby it is acquired, conceptually represented and produced.

GE 40101 – Friends and Friendship in German Literature
The idea and experience of friendship have been central to German literature and culture for centuries.  In particular, the eighteenth century, the era of the Enlightenment and the Classical Period, was known as the “century of friendship.”  In this course, we read and analyze letters, essays, as well as poetry, dramas and narrative texts, in which the phenomenon of friendship plays a central role.  We will study authors such as Winckelmann, Gleim, Goethe, Schiller, Clemens Brentano, Achim von Arnim, Bettina Brentano, Caroline von Günderode, Hesse, Georg Simmel and others. Taught in German

GE 40102 – Masterpieces in German Literature
A sampling of the most beautiful, moving, and humorous prose and poetry of the 20th Century will be read and interpreted. Selections may include, among others,Heinrich Boll, Wolfgang Borchert, Max Frisch, Karl Krolow, and Rainer Maria Rilke. The written assignments will evolve from the texts studied. Taught in German.

GE 40103 – Richard Wagner and the Artowrk of the Future
This course will introduce students to the aesthetic and cultural significance of the German composer Richard Wagner (1813-1883), as well as to his artistic legacy in a variety of media from film to computer games throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Focus on three of Wagner’s operas (Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg, Tristan und Isolde, and Parsifal) as well as on his theoretical writings. No formal training in music or ability to read notes is required. We will approach Wagner’s works through intensive study of actual performances, and students are consequently expected to participate in two mid-semester excursions to attend live productions. These excursions will be scheduled for weekends and paid for by Notre Dame. Taught in German.

GE 40104 – Self, Suffering, and Longing: German Narratives of the Long 19th Century
We will read closely four of Germany’s best known and most engaging narratives across the long 19th century. The works, which arose in four geographical regions of Germany, carrying markers of those regions, also cover a range of literary movements. Diverse narrative structures and techniques along with recurring themes will allow for comparison and contrast. Self, suffering, and longing, or, to offer some greater perspective, issues of identity and identity crises, conflict and suffering, and longing and hints of reconciliation will play a role as will nature, love, family, friendship, politics, art, and above all religion. We will open with Hölderlin’s Hyperion, an epistolary novel with a highly complex and engaging narrative structure that is among the most beautiful and simultaneously most philosophical of all German narratives. Büchner’s Lenz, a short story, based on historical documents, then thematizes the break from idealism, questions of God, and the struggle for meaning. Storm’s Der Schimmelreiter follows: a complex frame narrative that engages our relations to nature and others and exhibits dramatic, indeed tragic, dimensions. We conclude with the greatest narrative of 19th-century Germany, Fontane’s Effi Briest, a novel of character, rich in dialogue, that not only captures much of the society and values of late 19th-century Prussia, but also portrays some of the most memorable characters of world literature.

GE 40105 - Tragedy, Comedy, Identity
Germany has one of the world’s richest traditions of drama as well as arguably the greatest theorists of drama and of modern drama. We will read and discuss selected masterpieces of German drama, paying attention to its historical development; the nuances and ambiguities of individual works; categories of genre, above all tragedy and comedy, including challenges to these genre categories; and the ways in which identity and identity crises, both individual and collective, relate to issues of genre. Dramas to be read and discussed will include Lessing’s Minna von Barnhelm, Schiller’s Don Karlos, Büchner’s Leonce und Lena, Nestroy’s Der Zerrissene, Grillparzer’s Ein Bruderzwist in Habsburg, Hofmannsthal’s Der Schwierige, and Dürrenmatt’s Die Physiker. Some attention will also be given to distinctive German contributions to the theory of tragedy and comedy, including the singular contributions of Hegel and Scheler. 

GE 40215 - God, Love, and Sex in German Medieval Literature
This course explores the ways in which medieval Germans reconciled their sexuality with their spirituality ¿ or failed to. Through canonical romances, theater, poetry and mysticism, students will examine the way in which medieval religion influenced the way people experienced, thought about and wrote about romantic love and how romantic love in turn shaped religious devotion. Themes will include tokens of affection as relics, what it meant to be a ¿bride¿ of Christ, and the different ways divine and carnal love were experienced in and performed by the human body. Authors may include, among others, Hrotsvit von Gandersheim, Hartmann von Aue, Gottfried von Strassburg, Mechthild von Magdeburg and Meister Eckhart. The course will be conducted in German

GE 40440 – Goethe and His Time
An intensive study of Goethe’s major works of poetry, prose, and drama within the cultural framework of his times.

GE 40471 – Twentieth-Century Prose and Poetry
In order to acquaint the student with the rich diversity characteristic of 20th-Century German literature, a wide variety of materials will be studied. They will not only encompass various genres: the short story, the drama, and the poem, but will also represent various time periods: from the beginnings of the 20th century to the ’50s. Among others, readings will include: Franz Kafka, Die Verwandlung, Wolfgang Borchert, Draussen Vor Der Tur, and poems from Rilke to Celan. An oral report, two papers, and a two-hour final will supplement thorough and engaging class discussions based upon close readings of the selected texts.

GE 40472 - Twentieth-Century German Poetry from Rilke to Krolow
To acquaint the student with the rich diversity characteristic of 20th-Century German poetry, a wide variety of materials will be studied from Rilke to Krolow.

GE 40484 – Overcoming Political Tragedy
An interdisciplinary course in drama and peace studies. Drama is a potentially fascinating topic for peace studies because, at the heart of traditional drama and theatre, there is conflict-and the question of whether it can be resolved. Moreover, just as politics is often dramatic, drama is often political; there is, for example, an extensive tradition of plays that make a theme of political revolution, usually in the form of tragedy or comedy. Students in this course read classic political dramas that are neither tragedies nor comedies, but rather bring potentially tragic public conflict to positive yet nontrivial resolution. Having discussed definitions of tragedy and comedy, and what might be the advantages of aesthetic renditions of conflict, the class then reads some of these dramas of political reconciliation: Aeschylus, Oresteia/eumenides; Shakespeare, Measure for Measure; Calderon, The Mayor of Zalamea; Corneille, Cinna; Lessing, Nathan the Wise; Schiller, William Tell; Kleist, The Prince of Homburg; Brecht, The Caucasian Chalk Circle; Lan, Desire; and Fugard, Valley Song. (We also may include selected films, such as “Meet John Doe,” “On the Waterfront,” or “Twelve Angry Men.”) We will examine these plays (and films) through both the categories of drama analysis and theories of conflict resolution, mediation, and transformation, with the expectation of achieving greater depth in our interpretations of the dramatic texts and in our understanding of the theories of conflict resolution. Students of peace studies and political science who are familiar with these pieces of world literature will have acquired a new kind of resource for their ability to think through and work in conflict resolution.

GE 40490 – Schiller (in German)
In this course, we will consider Friedrich Schiller as a dramatist, poet, aesthetic philosopher, and historian. We will read several of Friedrich Schiller’s most important plays, including Die Rauber, Kabale Und Liebe, Die Verschworung Des Fiesko, Wallenstein, Maria Stuart, and Die Braut Von Messina. In addition, we will read from his letters on beauty (Kallias), and the essays “Uber Anmut Und Wurde,” “Uber Naive Und Sentimentalische Dichtung,” and “Die Asthetische Erziehung Des Menschen.” Finally, we will also read selections from his historical works on the Thirty Years’ War and on The Netherlands.

GE 40610 – Crises of Modernity in German Culture
To a European citizen living in the year 1900, the world would have seemed a promising place. The continent had enjoyed almost universal peace for the past eighty years, science and the arts were prospering, the economy was booming. Yet less than fifty years later, Europe lay in ruins, reeling from a half-century of war, economic depression and genocide. This course will set out to explore what happened. Instead of focusing on political, economic or military history, however, we will enter the minds of some of the thinkers and poets who shaped cultural life during the first third of the century, choosing Germany as our specimen case. It was here that modern thought attained its greatest heights and here, also, that it ultimately sank to its lowest depths. Through close analysis of selected texts, we will uncover how the heights and the depths were intimately related to one another, and how modernity was from the very beginning dogged by a series of profound crises.Readings and discussion in English. Students taking the course for German credit will study selected texts in the original and write their papers in German. Open to sophomores with permission of instructor only.Authors will include Nietzsche, Freud, Weber, Heidegger, Brecht, Hesse, Höch, Riefenstahl and others.

GE 40649 – Comedy, Jokes, and Satire in the German-Speaking World
This course will explore the comic vision in the German-speaking world, by considering comedy, jokes, and satire. Comedy is an often overlooked genre in Germany, but a number of fascinating works invite our reading and exploration. We will discuss comedies by Lessing, Büchner, Hofmannsthal, and Brecht. As part of our exploration of the comic vision, we will consider jokes, including their thematic and structural diversity as well as their relation to broader aspects of German culture, including German history and regional particularities. Students will explore Freud’s classic essay on jokes. Beyond considering Schiller’s famous theoretical statements on satire, we will look at satiric works by Heinrich Heine and Kurt Tucholsky; in addition we will note the strong German tradition of satire in painting and photomontage. We will also consider one or more comic or satiric films. As part of the course we will explore the conditions under which the comic tends to surface and flourish, including broader questions such as religious sensibility and political climate. 

GE 40669 – Modern Metropolis in German Literature
If Paris was known as the capital of the 19th Century, turn-of-the-century Berlin was declared the capital of the 20th Century. The largest then German metropolis came to epitomize rapid and spectacular modernization in Germany that started before World War I and continued during the Weimar Republic. Berlin had it all: gigantic industrial factories, glamorous boulevards, street lights, dazzling shop windows, night life, movies and entertainment, armies of white-collar employees, housing barracks, modern architecture, shopping, traffic, crime, and social problems. This course offers an introduction to one of the most dynamic periods in German cultural history (1900-33) as it is represented in texts and films about the big city. The discussions will focus on the following questions: Why did the big city appear fascinating and inspiring to some authors, and to others it loomed as a dreadful epitome of alienation and decadence? How were modern phenomena reflected in language and images? What were the forms of aesthetic innovation and artistic experimentation associated with the representation of modern life? Did men and women experience metropolitan modernity differently?

GE 40672 – The Modern German Short Story
The German short story and other forms of prose from the “Stunde Null” in 1945 to the 1990s. Authors range from East and West German writers of the immediate postwar era to the most recent commentators on issues of politics, society, gender, and aesthetics.

GE 40675 – Minority German Writers (in German)
This course explores German-language literature written by authors of non-German heritage. As a seminar it opens up the possibilities of reading a more diverse body of post-1945, and more specifically post-Wende, German literature. Secondary texts will help us to understand the social and historical context in which these authors write. The primary reading selections will include works by authors of African, Turkish, Sorbian, Roma, and Arab heritages.

GE 40685 – Twentieth-Century German Literature
This survey course introduces students to the major writers in 20th-century German-language literature. We will be reading, discussing, and writing about poems, short stories, and dramas by authors such as George, Hofmannsthal, Rilke, Trakl, Thomas Mann, Kafka, Musil, Brecht, Celan, Bachmann, Frisch, Dürrenmatt, Enzensberger, Christa Wolf, Peter Schneider, Brinkmann, Hahn, and Königsdorf. By also considering these writers, contexts—the trends and movements they were part of, the activities in the other arts that influenced them, the contemporary discourses that surrounded them—we may be able to add depth and nuance to our readings. Thus, depending on student interest and ability, we will familiarize ourselves with the larger environs of 20th-century German-language culture. Taught in German.

GE 40801 – Voice in Text and Theatre
In the 20th Century, voice gained importance in literature and in theatre. Stressing innovative forms of vocality, modern text and vanguard theatre aim to reveal the unconscious function of voice in written and spoken language. Verse or voice delivery are recognized not only as strategies to integrate physical heterogeneity in language and theatre, poets and theatre artists emphasize the vocal aspect of language as different vocal bodies. The course proposes to study the theoretical and esthetic implication of this phenomenon in confronting the new strategies of voice in text and in theater with historic ones. Among others, examples for voices will be text extracts from texts by Dante, Sollers, Racine, Goethe, Shakespeare, Artaud, Brecht, Heiner Muller featuring the vocal delivery styles of artists themselves or of interpreters like Carmelo Bene, Alexander Moissi, Fritz Kortner, Dario Fo, Klaus Michael Gruber, Robert Wilson, Meredith Monk, and Laurie Anderson. Please note: this three-credit course runs for eight weeks, from February 28, 2006 to April 20, 2006.

GE 40850 – Deutschen Kriminalroman
Verbrechen, Detektion, und Gerechtigkeit im deutschen Kriminalroman(Crime, Detection and Justice in the German Crime Story)Tales of crime and detection famously engage their readers in enthralling stories about perplexing criminal acts and the harrowing search to solve the crimes and to capture and judge the guilty. Through these depictions, German detective stories however also fundamentally challenge ideas of justice. They present the reader with questions such as: What is the source of justice? Which type of justice drives the detective? Which idea of justice determines the judgment? And, what happens when these ideas are at odds? In this course we will look at the changing depictions of justice in German detective stories from 1786 to the present and how they cast a critical light on society. Each work will be read and discussed with careful attention to its formal characteristics as well as to the historical changes in the judicial system that are reflected in the works. Among the authors we will read are: Schiller, Kleist, Hoffmann, Dürrenmatt and Schlink.

GE 40855 – German Drama 1750 to the Present (in German)
We will read and discuss some of the greatest plays in the German dramatic tradition, by authors such as Lessing, Goethe, Schiller, Kleist, Grillparzer, Nestroy, Freitag, Hauptmann, Hofmannsthal, Brecht, and Werfel. This semester we will focus on the so-called “drama of reconciliation,” a newly rediscovered genre, where the conflict is serious but ends harmoniously. By interpreting classic German-language plays in the original, you will (1) learn how to approach drama analysis, and (2) develop a sense for the history of drama throughout the past 250 years. In addition, we will study a few short, and often English-language, texts in the theory of drama (Aristotle, Schelling, Carriere, and Cavell, as well as the department’s own Hosle and Roche), which will (3) allow you to differentiate between the basic genres of drama (tragedy, comedy, and drama of reconciliation), and 4) better understand the nature of conflict and reconciliation. Students interested in other national literatures will have the opportunity to draw comparisons with plays by authors such as Aeschylus, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Calderon, Corneille, Racine, and Ibsen; and those interested in film may branch out into analyzing works by directors such as Hitchcock, Renoir, Ford, Capra, Curtiz, Hawks, Chaplin, and Kurosawa.

GE 40889 – Religious Themes in German Literature and Thought
We will read and discuss selected works of German literature and intellectual history from the Enlightenment to the present. Issues considered will include the unity and diversity of religious traditions, secularization, the theodicy, the Incarnation, the Trinity, various critiques of religion, the responsibility of the Church, religion and intellectuals, and the intersections of religion and art. The course addresses both the literary embodiment of religious themes in narrative, poetry, and drama and essayistic analyses of religious issues. Although our works will cover a range of centuries, we will focus on three periods: first, the late 18th and early 19th century, an era of great religious intensity, even as the harmony of diverse religions and the secularization of religion were proclaimed; second, the 19th century, an age of significant systematic and polemical attacks on specific aspects of religion and on religion in its entirety; and third, the 20th century, which presents a complex array of religious and antireligious sentiments. Writers to be considered include, among others, Lessing, Novalis, Schleiermacher, Hölderlin, Hegel, Heine, Büchner, Grillparzer, Feuerbach, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Langgässer, Buber, and Hochhuth.

GE 40891 – Evil and the Lie (English and German)
Beyond the din, the limitless freedom, the proliferating options to make more money and/or live longer, what really matters? Do I really matter?
These questions – essentially they are one and the same – must be answered, for in the search itself, value is ascribed not only to the principle or person valued, but also and inevitably to the person valuing. For better or worse we, as individuals and as a society, are defined by what matters to us.
Given the distortions of our age, it may be appropriate to look for moral guidance from those who clearly did not find the right answers, failed to enhance their lives or the lives of those around them. Sometimes we know unequivocally what is right by observing someone do it all wrong. Nevertheless, at least since Adam and Eve, the wrong has held undeniable appeal. What draws us toward evil over and over again?
“Angels boring? Yes – until they fall! Then the angel takes on fascination and interest. . . . When an angel assumes independent self- assertion – call it pride or refusal to knuckle under or what not – he then takes on power and the capacity to grasp our attention and even admiration.” These insights represent the clinical conclusions of Rollo May in his Love and Will. More than half a century earlier, as if he also had been trained as a psychoanalyst, Oscar Wilde phrases the observation in similar terms. He describes Dorian Gray contemplating his own by then seriously flawed portrait suffused “with that pride of individualism that is half the fascination of sin. . . .”
Self-assertion, individualism and freedom of choice are unquestionably laudable in and of themselves, but at what point does the pursuit of these principles no longer further integrated self-actualization? At what juncture does appropriate self-interest develop into narcissism, become evil and thus not lead, as was originally intended, to the fulfillment of the human person, but, if left unchecked, unerringly to the diametric opposite, namely his or her destruction?
Where can examples be found of those who misread the early, still reversible signs of narcissistic behavior, who did not make the requisite course correction and subsequently annihilated not only themselves, but their all too numerous victims as well? If we studied these individuals, might we not learn from them and thus possibly avoid making their mistakes? And as a result, might we not lead our lives more efficiently, more productively? Quite simply, might we not evolve into happier individuals?
In an effort to tackle these questions, among others, we will read in this sequence: Friedrich Dürrenmatt, Der Verdacht/The Suspicion (1951), Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891), André Gide, The Immoralist (1902), Max Frisch, Andorra (1961).
Two screenings: Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray
     Colin Dexter, The Masonic Mysteries

GE 40911 – Self-Definition and Quest for Happiness in Continental and American Prose of the Twentieth Century
Everyone from the ancients to the most technologically conscious CEOs tell us that those who succeed know the difference between the important and the unimportant and they allocate their time accordingly. But how does one make these choices? If, in fact, success and happiness are synonymous, as some would claim, which way lies success, lies happiness? And what are the guideposts? What really matters? In an age such as ours, does anything have lasting value? Do I really matter? If I am most assuredly defined by my beliefs and my deeds, what then do I believe, what do I do? In the final analysis, who am I? If literature, as so many maintain, not only mirrors but also foretells world events, how have several 20th-century authors representing diverse national traditions formulated the answers to these seminal questions? Readings will include F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Albert Camus, The Stranger; and Max Frisch, Homo Faber.

GE 40980 – The German Quest for God: From the Middles Ages to Our Time
One of the peculiarities of German culture is the strong connection between philosophy and literature; another the heroic attempt to develop a religion no longer based on authority, but on reason. We will discuss the main steps in this German quest for God, alternating philosophical and literary texts by authors such as Hartmann von Aue, Meister Eckhart, Luther, Grimmelshasen, Lessing, Hegel, Thomas Mann, and Steinherr. Texts and discussions in English. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

GE 40988 – Plato Before The Republic
Plato is the philosopher most difficult to interpret. The range of his interests, the innovative nature and the complexity of his thought, finally the fact that he does not speak in first person adds to the difficulty. After a general introduction into the main problems and positions of Plato scholarship today, we will read some of his dialogues written before his most important work, The Republic, dealing with such various topics as virtues, the nature of art, the relation of ethics and religion, the politics of Athens, and the essence of knowledge. We will analyze both his arguments and the literary devices by which he communicates them and partly withholds and alludes to further ideas.

GE 40989 – Philosophiae Dialogues
Philosophy is communicated in different literary genres-as essays, treatises, didactic poems- the choice of which influences in a subtle manner the contents exposed. One of the most interesting literary genres used by philosophers is certainly the dialogue, since it allows to hide the author’s mind behind a variety of different positions which get the chance to articulate themselves and since it shows the connection between philosophical ideas and discursive behavior. We shall read different texts ranging from Plato to Feyerabend to see how different philosophers have exploited the possibilities of this genre.

GE 43155 - Faith, hope, and love: Thomas Aquinas and Kierkegaard on Christian Ethics
The course aims at clarifying both the differences between Christian and ancient ethics and the contrast between Catholic and Lutheran theological ethics. Faith, hope, and charity being regarded as the classical theological virtues, it deals with Aquinas's and Kierkegaard's treatment of these theological virtues. We will read the first treatise in the Secunda secundae of Aquinas's 'Summa theologica' as well as Kierkegaard's 'Fear and Trembling' and 'Deeds of Love', analyse the arguments, the literary form of the texts, the connections with the overall view of the two philosopher-theologians and the historical position of the texts.

GE 43300 - Seminar in German Studies
In this seminar, students will examine the intersection of various disciplines and topics depending upon the instructor's specialty. In addition to language and literature, topics may include culture, history, politics, film, feminist studies, music and other related disciplines. The course may be repeated.

GE 43400 – Max Kade Seminar
This is a seminar that is taught every spring by a distinguished Professor of German from Germany.

GE 43402 - Holocaust in German/US Memory
Whose lives matter? In light of current events such as the racially motivated violence in Charlottesville last summer, this course explores the legacy of slavery and Holocaust memory (and their limits) from a comparative perspective. Drawing on German and U.S. American fiction, film, photography, comics, and art, we investigate how various media cultures bear witness to intercultural histories of genocide. This interdisciplinary course is taught in English.

Spring2015:
Fleeing to Germany/Fleeing from Germany: The Refugee Crises and German Identity in Political, Historical, and Cultural Perspective - For years, we have been accustomed to thinking of Germany as the preeminent country from which people have fled: namely from Nazi Germany. Yet, in recent years, Germany as become the fervently desired goal for refugees the world over, most recently from Syria and the Middle East. In this course, we will see that these events are dialectically related: it was precisely the experience of Nazism that created a new, postwar openness to persecuted peoples. And yet this too is a complicated story with many twists and turns. In this course, we will make a broad cultural assessment of the refugee phenomenon, drawing upon the tools of political science, history, and cultural studies. The aim of this course is to explore political and cultural phenomena. In order to understand the current situation, we will also examine select films and novels depicting the last decades.

GE 43439 – Goethe on His Life and on His Discovery of Italy
Goethe is doubtless the greatest German poet. He was the last Renaissance man—a philosophical mind, a scientist, and a statesman, who has written some of the most sublime German literature in all three genres. But one of his greatest artworks was his own life. We will read his autobiography Dichtung Und Warheit, which gives us a splendid overview of Germany’s intellectually most prolific time, and his Italienische Reise, one of the most intense experiences of the essence of Italian culture ever. One of the focuses of the seminar will be on the literary transformation of biographical facts peculiar to all autobiographies, and to Goethe’s in particular.

GE 43483 – Seminar on German Women Writers (in German)
Participants in this seminar will explore the rich literary history of female writers from German-speaking Europe. We read works of many genres (drama, short story, novella, novel, letter) by women from the early Middle Ages to the present. In the process, we encounter Europe’s first playwright, one of the 21st Century’s brightest young literary stars, and an array of intriguing women who lived in the interim. We scrutinize and apply various theoretical and critical approaches to women’s literature, both in writing and in lively debates.

GE 43499 – German Literature Senior Seminar
Seminar devoted to the intensive study of selected works, periods, and genres of German literature.

GE 44347 - Imagining Europe: From Age of Enlightenment to Age of the Euro
Over the past few years, the question ¿what is Europe and what should it be?¿ has provoked increasingly heated discussions throughout the entire continent. On the one hand, the Norwegian Nobel Committee awarded the 2012 Nobel Peace Prize to the European Union; on the other, the European people seem as divided as ever before in their history, with the split between the Protestant North and the Mediterranean South running especially deep. One common complaint is that the EU is a technocratic union that has never really managed to take root in the dreams and aspirations of its citizens. In this seminar, we will examine how poets, novelists, and filmmakers have imagined Europe over the course of the last 200 years. How do you give an imaginative shape to something that is too vast to ever be encompassed in its entirety, and too complex to be reduced to any uniform vision? We will read travel journals, observe how shared folk stories were turned into ¿national¿ literatures, study how Europe has defined itself in opposition to the putatively non-European, and investigate how common tragedies such as the Holocaust and communist dictatorships sowed the seeds for a continental identity. Throughout the semester, we will make use of London¿s panoply of resources to support our studies.

GE 44426 - Remembering the Great War in Britain and Germany
August 2014 marks the centenary of the Great War, an event that will be commemorated throughout Europe over the course of the following year. The London Undergraduate Program gives Notre Dame students a unique opportunity to observe these commemorations and learn about the various ways in which the war contributed to the formation of modern European identity. Our course will focus on two case studies (Great Britain and Germany) drawn from opposite sides of the military conflict, and will investigate the various ways in which poets, artists, historians, and ordinary people have tried to make sense of these cataclysmic events over the course of the last 100 years. About half of the semester will be devoted to the actual participants in the war, who left us a rich body of literature reflecting on their experiences. In the second half of the course, we will examine how memories of the Great War shaped the subsequent histories of Britain and Germany and we will observe the centenary celebrations in all their diversity (parades, speeches, museum exhibits, television features and newspaper reports) to arrive at an answer to the question what the Great War might still mean to people at the dawn of the twenty-first century.

GE 44675 - Migration and Literature
This course explores German-language literature written by authors of non-German heritages. As a seminar it opens up the possibilities of reading a more diverse body of post-1945, and more specifically post-Wende, German literature. Specifically, this course is interested in the concepts of "hybridity" and "multiculturalism". Authors we will read include Herta Mueller, Valdimir Vertlib, Dragica Raj'i', Yoko Tawada, and Emine Sevgi Özdamar, and Feridun Zaimoglu.

GE 46100 - Directed Readings-German
Intensive study with a faculty member in the student's area of interest. Normally, only available to majors.

GE 47498 – Special Studies
Prerequisite: senior standing, Dean’s list.

GE 48100 - International Economics Senior Research Project
This course is reserved for students in the International Economics in German major for completion of their senior thesis project. 

GE 48439 – Goethe’s Lives
Goethe is doubtless the greatest German poet. He was the last Renaissance man – a philosophical mind, a scientist, and a statesman, who wrote some of the most sublime German literature in all three genres. But one of his greatest artworks was his own life. We will read his autobiography, Dichtung und Wahrheit, which gives us a splendid overview of Germany’s intellectually most prolific time, and his Italienische Reise, one of the most intense experiences of the essence of Italian culture ever. One of the focuses of the seminar will be on the literary transformation of biographical facts peculiar to all autobiographies, and to Goethe’s in particular.

GE 48499 – Senior Thesis
German majors who wish to graduate with honors may write a senior thesis. For those German majors who elect to write a thesis, several requirements must be met: (1) The student must have a GPA of 3.5 or higher in the major, (2) the thesis must be at least 30 pages long, and (3) the thesis must be written in German. The student writing a thesis enrolls in GE 48499 and receives one course credit (three credit hours) for the course. Although the thesis is graded by the advisor (to receive honors, the thesis must receive a grade of B+ or higher), the entire department reads the thesis, acting as an advisory body to the advisor. The thesis is due the week after spring break, and the student is strongly advised to begin thinking about it and start conferring with the advisor before the October break of the fall term.

GE 53100 - Literary Theory: Philology and Weltliteratur
The Literature Programs course on Literary Theory deals with theories of different time and places with emphasis on the critical problems that arise when what we call "Literature" is investigated in a multicultural context. Issues that may be expected to arise include the following the problems of translation, the meaning of metaphor, hermeneutics complexity, the meaning of the word "style" the relation between oral and written literatures. Eric Auerbach's essay "Philology and Weltliteratur", from which this course derives its title, serves as a point of departure for exploring the possibility of developing an approach to literary history and literary interpretation that: (a) attends to the historical, cultural and aesthetic specificity of the individual literary work and (b) at the same time, brings into relief the complex ways in which cultures interact, overlap, and modify one another. The course will focus primarily on the pertinent works of Vico, Herder, and the German Romantics, Auerbach (and other historicists), Arnold, C. L. R. James, Raymond Williams, and Edward W. Said, as well as selections from the writings of Fanon, Ngugi, Lamming, Cesaire, and others.

GE 60501 – German Graduate Reading
Intended as review for graduate students who wish to take the GRE in German. The final examination of the course, if passed, fulfills the requirements of the GRE.

GE 60502 – The ABC’s of Reading & Writing
At most two works will be read: Durrenmatt’s Der Richter und sein Henker and Der Besuch der alten Dame. We will read these carefully with great attention to detail. Writing assignments will evolve from the readings; they may include a character portrayal, the description of an outdoor event, a short conversation, description of a crime scene, etc. They will increase in length from a single paragraph to two or three pages.

GE 62301 – German Reading Group
This one-credit (satisfactory/unsatisfactory) reading course is designed to introduce students who have the equivalent of four-semesters or more of college German, that is, the equivalent of German 20202 or more, to an interesting work in German and to help them continue to develop their reading skills as well as their pronunciation. The language of discussion will be English, thus opening the course to a wide range of students, undergraduate as well as graduate.  The spring 2015 topic is Joseph Roth’s Hiob. Roman eines einfachen Mannes (1930). Past topics have included Heinrich Heine’s Zur Geschichte der Religion und Philosophie in Deutschland (1834).

GE 63100 - German for Advanced Research
Prerequisite: Students who enroll in this course should either have had "German for Reading Knowledge" or possess the equivalent competency. If in doubt, please contact the instructor. Open to advanced undergraduates with the permission of the instructor

GE 90113 – Business German
German business language and practices. Designed to introduce the internationally oriented business and German major to the language, customs and practices of the German business world.

GE 90215 – Medieval German Literature
GE 315 constitutes a survey of German literature from its beginnings during Germanic times until the 16th century. Ideas, issues and topics are discussed in such a way that their continuity can be seen throughout the centuries. Lectures and discussions are in German, but individual students’ language abilities are taken into consideration. Readings include modern German selections from major medieval authors and works such as Hildebrandslied, Rolandslied, Nibelungenlied, Iwein, Parzival, Tristan, courtly lyric poetry, the German mystics, secular and religious medieval drama, Der Ackermann aus Buhmen, and the beast epic Reineke Fuchs. Class discussions and brief presentations in German by students on the selections are intended as an opportunity for stimulating exchange and formal use of German.

GE 90286 – Der Artusroman – Arthurian Epic
Come and explore the enduring legend of King Arthur and his court as interpreted by German authors of the high Middle Ages (late 12th and 13th centuries). We spend the majority of the semester on the three best-known and most complete Arthurian epics in the German tradition: Erec and Iwein by Hartmann von Aue, and Wolfram von Eschenbach’s Parzival, as well as other later German adaptations they influenced. These tales are among the most imaginative and fascinating in the German canon, full of the adventures and exploits of knights and ladies. Our exploration of these texts focuses on their relationship to their French and English predecessors, on the many twists and turns in story line and character development that each individual author creates, and on the information they suggest about “real” life in the medieval world. We also take a look at some of the most interesting modern literary and film adaptations of the Arthurian legend.

GE 90440 – Goethe and His Time
An intensive study of Goethe’s major works of poetry, prose, and drama within the cultural framework of his times.

GE 90490 – Schiller
In this course, we will consider Friedrich Schiller as a dramatist, poet, aesthetic philosopher, and historian. We will read several of Friedrich Schiller’s most important plays, including Die Rauber, Kabale und Liebe, Die Verschworung des Fiesko, Wallenstein, Maria Stuart, and Die Braut von Messina. In addition, we will read from his letters on beauty (Kallias), and the essays Uber Anmut und Wurde, Uber naive und sentimentalische Dichtung and Die Asthetische Erziehung des Menschen. Finally, we will also read selections from his historical works on the Thirty Years’ War and on the Netherlands.

GE 90501 – 19th Century German Literature
The course will provide students with an opportunity to read, discuss, and analyze representative 19th century novellas by such authors as Kleist, Keller, Meyer, Storm, and Hauptmann. These texts will be treated as both literary and historical documents. The course will examine the literary techniques common to the novella and offer a historical survey of the various theories of this rich and especially German genre. It will also attempt to access the works through the contextual framework of the social and politico-economic events and trends of the 19th Century in German-speaking countries. Finally, particular emphasis will be placed on the psychological implications of the works.

GE 90556 – Dramatic Lit before 1900
An advanced survey of theatrical literature and criticism from the earliest plays to the beginning of the 20th century. Students will read one to two plays per week along with selected secondary critical literature.

GE 90561 – European Romanticism
This course will present the figure of Giacomo Leopardi, the outstanding romantic Italian Poet, and his striking similarities with some of the protagonists of that season of poetry: Wordsworth, Keats, Holderlin, and, later, Baudelaire. We will also delve into the Operette morali and the private diary called Zibaldone to illustrate the surprising depth of Leopardi’s thinking, one of the most original and perceptive explorations of the human condition ever prospected. We will show that this isolated poet and thinker was one of the founders of modern nihilism, and we will compare his most stunning ideas to the ones elaborated by his great contemporary Schopenhauer and by the modern existentialist thought.

GE 90565 – The German Novella
This course will explore the German “Novella,” one of the most popular genres of 19th-century German literature. Each work will be read and discussed with careful attention to its formal characteristics as well as its historical and cultural contexts. By proceeding chronologically through the literary periods of Romanticism, Biedermeier, Poetic Realism, and Naturalism, students will gain a sense of literary developments in the 19th century and how these reflect shifts within the broader culture. Among the writers to be read: Goethe, Tieck, Kleist, Hoffmann, Eichendorff, Stifter, Storm, Keller and Hauptmann. Writing will be emphasized. Students will be required to rewrite each of their essays.

GE 90635 – Natl. Theatre: Contemp. Europe
This course provides students with insight into the development of European theatre, from Brecht-Weigel’s work at the Berliner Ensemble to the theatre works of Giorgio Strehler at the Piccolo (Italy), Peter Brook at the Buffes de Nord (UK, France), Ariane Mnouchkine at Theatre de Soleil (France), Peter Stein at the Schaubeuhne, Pina Bausch at Tanztheater Wuppertal, and Heiner Mueller and Einar Schleef at the Volksbuehne and the Berlin Ensemble (Germany). Students are introduced to the main productions of these directors, their theatrical roots, and their influence on contemporary European theater and playwriting.

GE 90648 – German Cinema in the Weimar Republic (1918-1933)
For those desiring German credit, advanced standing in German (five semesters or permission of instructor) is necessary. The years between 1918 and 1933 are the Golden Age of German film. In its development from Expressionism to Social Realism, the German cinema produced works of great variety, many of them in the international avant-garde. This course gives an overview of the silent movies and sound films made during the Weimar Republic and situate them in their artistic, social, and political context. The oeuvre of Fritz Lang, the greatest German director, receives special attention. Should we interpret Lang’s disquieting visual style as a highly individual phenomenon independent of its environment, or can we read his obsessive themes (world conspiracies and terrorized masses, compulsive violence and revenge, entrapment and guilt) as a mirror image of the historical period? Might his films, as come critics have suggested, even illustrate how a national psyche gets enmeshed in fascist ideology? Films subtitled, dubbed, or in English; readings, lectures, and discussions in English. For German credit, reading and writing of German required.

GE 90650 – The Nazi Past in Postwar German Film
How have German films since 1945 been trying to deal with the Nazi past? How do Germans picture their memories of the Third Reich, how do they define themselves within and against their country’s history, and how do they live with their remembrances now? Primarily, this class aims at issues in the realm of ethics (perpetrators, victims, and passive accomplices; stereotypes; courage and cowardice; personal and national guilt; revisionism, coming-to-terms, and productive memory; responsibility and the [im]possibility of reconciliation). Some central questions about German history during the Third Reich and the postwar era will be dealt with. The course will also develop basic categories of film analysis and ask questions about the special capacity of film to help a nation work through its past. Films subtitled, dubbed, or English language. Readings, lectures and discussions in English.

GE 90669 – Modern Metropolis German Lit
If Paris was known as the capital of the 19th Century, turn-of-the-century Berlin was declared the capital of the 20th Century. The largest then German metropolis came to epitomize rapid and spectacular modernization in Germany that started before World War I and continued during the Weimar Republic. Berlin had it all: gigantic industrial factories, glamorous boulevards, street lights, dazzling shop windows, night life, movies and entertainment, armies of white-collar employees, housing barracks, modern architecture, shopping, traffic, crime, and social problems. This course offers an introduction into one of the most dynamic periods in German cultural history (1900-1933) as it is represented in texts and films about the big city. The discussions will focus on the following questions: Why did the big city appear fascinating and inspiring to some authors, and to others it loomed as a dreadful epitome of alienation and decadence? How were modern phenomena reflected in language and images? What were the forms of aesthetic innovation and artistic experimentation associated with the representation of modern life? Did men and women experience metropolitan modernity differently?

GE 90671 – 20th Century Poetry and Prose
To make the student aware of the rich diversity of both form and content extant in 20th-century literature, a wide variety of materials will be studied. They will not only encompass various genres (the poem, the short story, the novel and the drama) but will also represent various time periods, from the early 1900s to the ’70s. Among others, readings will include Rilke; Martin, Die Weise von Liebe und Tod des Cornets Christoph Rilke; Kafka, Der Landarzt; Durrenmatt, Der Richter und sein Henker; Borchert, Draussen vor der Tur.

GE 90672 – Modern German Short Story
Modern German Prose: the German short story and other forms of prose from the “Stunde Null” in 1945 to the 1990s. Authors range from East and West German writers of the immediate postwar era to the most recent commentators on issues of politics, society, gender and aesthetics.

GE 90675 – Minority German Writers
This course explores German-language literature written by authors of non-German heritages. As a seminar it opens up the possibilities of reading a more diverse body of post-1945, and more specifically post-Wende, German literature. Secondary texts will help us to understand the social and historical context in which these authors write. The primary reading selections will include works by authors of African, Turkish, Sorbian, Roma and Arab heritages.

GE 90678 – Kaspar Hauser
The historical Kaspar Hauser emerged in 1828 in Nurnberg: a 16 or 17 year-old boy who could hardly speak and had apparently been kept in isolated captivity since his earliest childhood before he was turned out by an unknown person. Kaspar Hauser’s identity remained mysterious, as did the reasons for his later murder. Kaspar Hauser has become a symbol of modern consciousness. He is a metaphor for the homelessness of human beings in the world, for the problematic relationship between the individual and the society, for the connection between the ability to use and understand language, self-consciousness, and identity. Modernist poets above all have recognized themselves in him and have taken his case as the starting point of their own reflections on the difficulties of literary existence. Even today Kaspar Hauser remains an attractive theme in literature and the formative arts as well as in film. In this course we will follow this theme in the works of Jacob Wassermann, Paul Verlaine, Georg Trakl. Peter Handke, Wim Wenders, and Paul Auster.

GE 90685 – Discourses of Unity – Disunity
The fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 brought the hope of unity to two diverse German traditions. Yet despite rapid political and geographical unification, even now, more than 15 years later, Germany seems in many respects more dis-unified than ever. In this course we will examine the unity discourse in contemporary German film and text. Focusing in particular on current depictions of the former East and West, we will consider whether these representations contribute to a new sense to national unity by emphasizing the similarities in a common past and present, or whether in fact they accentuate a sense of disunity by bringing out areas of difference, divergence and even conflict. The course will facilitate exploratons of the literary, cultural and historical impact of (dis)unity in present-day Germany through intensive discussion, written essays, and short student-led presentations.

GE 90697 – Directed Readings
Directed readings in the German and Russian Department.

GE 90801 – Voice in Text and Theatre
In the 20th Century, voice gained importance in literature and in theatre. Stressing innovative forms of vocality, modern text and vanguard theatre aim to reveal the unconscious function of voice in written and spoken language. Verse or voice delivery are recognized not only as strategies to integrate physical heterogeneity in language and theatre, poets and theatre artists emphasize the vocal aspect of language as different vocal bodies. The course proposes o study the theoretical and esthetic implication of this phenomena in confronting the new strategies of voice in text and in theater with historic ones. Among others, examples for text voices will be text extracts from texts by Dante, Sollers, Racine, Goethe, Shakespeare, Artaud, Brecht, Heiner Muller featuring the vocal delivery styles of artists themselves or of interprets like Carmelo Bene, Alexander Moissi, Fritz Kortner, Dario Fo, Klaus Michael Gruber, Robert Wilson, Meredith Monk, Laurie Anderson. Please note: this three credit course runs for eight weeks, from February 28, 2006 to April 20, 2006.

GE 90855 – German Drama 1750 to the Present
We will read and discuss some of the greatest plays in the German dramatic tradition, by authors such as Lessing, Goethe, Schiller, Kleist, Grillparzer, Nestroy, Freitag, Hauptmann, Hofmannsthal, Brecht, and Werfel. This semester we will focus on the so-called “drama of reconciliation,” a newly rediscovered genre, where the conflict is serious but ends harmoniously. By interpreting classic German-language plays in the original, you will (1) learn how to approach drama analysis, and you will (2) develop a sense for the history of drama throughout the past 250 years. In addition, we will study a few short, and often English-language, texts in the theory of drama (Aristotle, Schelling, Carriere, and Cavell, as well as our department’s own Hosle and Roche), which will (3) allow you to differentiate between the basic genres of drama (tragedy, comedy, and drama of reconciliation), and you will (4) understand better the nature of conflict and reconciliation. Students interested in other national literatures will have the opportunity to draw comparisons with plays by authors such as Aeschylus, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Calderon, Corneille, Racine, and Ibsen; and those interested in film may branch out into analyzing works by directors such as Hitchcock, Renoir, Ford, Capra, Curtiz, Hawks, Chaplin, and Kurosawa.

GE 90884 – Overcoming Political Tragedy: An Interdisciplinary Course in Drama and Peace Studies
An interdisciplinary course in drama and peace studies. Drama is a potentially fascinating topic for peace studies because, at the heart of traditional drama and theatre, there is conflict-and the question of whether it can be resolved. Moreover, just as politics is often dramatic, drama is often political; there is, for example, an extensive tradition of plays that make a theme of political revolution, usually in the form of tragedy or comedy. Students in this course read classic political dramas that are neither tragedies nor comedies but rather bring potentially tragic public conflict to positive yet nontrivial resolution. Having discussed definitions of tragedy and comedy, and what might be the advantages of aesthetic renditions of conflict, the class then reads some of these dramas of political reconciliation: Aeschylus, Oresteia/Eumenides; Shakespeare, Measure for Measure; Calderon, The Mayor of Zalamea; Corneille, Cinna; Lessing, Nathan the Wise; Schiller, William Tell; Kleist, The Prince of Homburg; Brecht, The Caucasian Chalk Circle; Lan, Desire; and Fugard, Valley Song. (We also may include selected films, such as Meet John Doe, On the Waterfront, or Twelve Angry Men.) We will examine these plays (and films) through both the categories of drama analysis and theories of conflict resolution, mediation, and transformation, with the expectation of achieving greater depth in our interpretations of the dramatic texts and in our understanding of the theories of conflict resolution. Students of peace studies and political science who are familiar with these pieces of world literature will have acquired a new kind of resource for their ability to think through and work in conflict resolution. Being able to draw on such artistically crafted illustrations of political mediation opens up historically diverse, cross-cultural, and emotionally nuanced perspectives onto the topic of their studies. Conversely, students of drama and theatre will acquire more sophisticated technical instruments for the analysis of aesthetic conflict. It is hoped that guest speakers from other departments will participate in the class. All discussions, texts, and papers are in English, and special arrangements can be made for students of German.

GE 90889 – Literature and Religion
Literature, according to Martin Walser, descends just as irrefutably from religion as human beings do from the apes. Indeed, there is no denying that even during aesthetic modernism, literature, art, and religion are closely intertwined. When art achieved autonomous status in the second half of the 18th century, it did, to be sure, shed its subservient function relative to religion, yet in terms of its topics, themes, and, most particularly, its claim to interpret and give meaning to human existence literature remained tied to religion, in fact became its great rival. This seminar will examine several stations of this development. Beginning with church hymns during the Renaissance and Barock, we will see how the Bible was discovered as a literary text in the 18th century. At the end of the century, art is conceived as an autonomous, even holy artifact. Poetry, for some, even becomes the medium of human self-definition and the place in which new myths are created. In the Romantic period art and religion become fused into a single unity. A century later, art and religion again come into close contact in lyric poetry of the fin-de-siecle. The seminar concludes with a consideration of the psalm form in 20th-century poetry. Readings will include works by Luther, Paul Gerhardt, Klopstock, Holderlin, Wackenroder, Stefan George, Rilke, Trakl, Brecht, Celan, and Bachmann.

GE 90891 – Evil and the Lie
In an attempt to define the nature of evil and its relation to such phenomena as lying and the preservation of a self-image, this seminar will carefully analyze works spanning the years 1890-1972. Among them will be Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray; Gide, The Immoralist; and Frisch, Andorra. Further courses acceptable for Comparative Literature majors will be found listed by the Department of English. Consultation of program director is required.

GE 90905 – “Siegfried”: How Richard Wagner’s Opera became a Code Word of Anit-Semitism
Richard Wagner was not only a musician, but also a prolific author. Indeed, his writings from the late 1840s onward are essential for a complete understanding of his music. In particular, his infamous essay “On Jewishness in Music” of 1850 lays the racist and anti-Semitic foundation for his final and most controversial work, Parsifal of 1882. In this course, we will focus on the anti-Semitic element of Wagner’s creations and trace the evolution of the Wagner cult that began even before his death and culminated in his virtual deification during the National Socialism regime. Indeed, one can argue that Wagner’s influence reached its apex – or perhaps better its nadir – in a phrase by Adolf Hitler that was inscribed on a bronze plaque above the museum erected in Munich to house the infamous exhibition on “Degenerate Art” in 1937: “Art is a sublime mission that demands fanaticism.”

GE 90911 – Self Def & Quest for Happiness
Everyone from the ancients to the most technologically conscious CEOs tell us that those who succeed know the difference between the important and the unimportant and they allocate their time accordingly. But how does one make these choices? If in fact success and happiness are synonymous, as some would claim, which way lies success, lies happiness? And what are the guideposts? What really matters? In an age such as ours, does anything have lasting value? Do I really matter? If I am most assuredly defined by my beliefs and my deeds, what then do I believe, what do I do? In the final analysis, who am I? If literature, as so many maintain, not only mirrors but also foretells world events, how have several 20th-century authors representing diverse national traditions formulated the answers to these seminal questions? Readings will include F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Albert Camus, The Stranger; Max Frisch, Homo Faber.

GE 90980 – Goethe to Nietzsche to Kafka: The Search for God in German Literature and Philosophy
One of the peculiarities of German culture is the strong connection between philosophy and literature; another is the heroic attempt to develop a religion no longer based on authority, but on reason. We will discuss the main steps in this German quest for God, alternating philosophical and literary texts by authors such as Lessing, Goethe, Kant, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and Kafka. Texts and discussions in English.

GE 90989 – Drama on Political Conflicts
To understand politics and the moral conflicts involved in it, we have three sources: philosophy, social science, and the arts. The arts are often neglected, but wrongly so, for the insights Aeschylus, Sophocles, Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Schiller, Kleist, Grillparzer-the authors we will read-have to offer into the logic of power and the morality of political choices are flabbergasting. At the same time, we will develop esthetical criteria that will allow us to evaluate the dramas on literary grounds.

GE 90997 – Directed Readings
An individual reading or research course for German language degree candidates only.

GE 90998 – Plato Before The Republic
After a general introduction into the main problems and positions of Plato scholarship today, we will read some of his dialogues written before his most important work, the Republic, dealing with as various topics as virtues, the nature of art, the relation of ethics and religion, the politics of Athens and the essence of knowledge. We will analyze both his arguments and the literary devices by which he communicates them. Knowledge of Greek very welcome, but not requisite.

GE 90999 – Thesis Direction
Research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.

GE 93439 – Goethe’s Lives
Goethe is doubtless the greatest German poet. He was the last Renaissance man -a philosophical mind, a scientist and a statesman, who has written some of the most sublime German literature in all three genres. But one of his greatest artworks was his own life. We will read his autobiography, Dichtung und Wahrheit, which gives us a splendid overview of Germany’s intellectually most prolific time, and his Italienische Reise, one of the most intense experiences of the essence of Italian culture ever. One of the focuses of the seminar will be on the literary transformation of biographical facts peculiar to all autobiographies, and to Goethe’s in particular.

GE 93483 – Seminar on German Women Writers
Participants in this seminar will explore the rich literary history of female writers from German-speaking Europe. We read works of many genres (drama, short story, novella, novel, letter) by women from the early Middle Ages to the present. In the process, we encounter Europe’s first playwright, one of the 21st Century’s brightest young literary stars, and an array of intriguing women who lived in the interim. We scrutinize and apply various theoretical and critical approaches to women’s literature, both in writing and in lively debates.

GE 93499 – German Literature Senior Seminar
Seminar devoted to the intensive study of selected works, periods, and genres of German literature.

GE 96607 – Directed Readings
This course provides an opportunity for students to be able to pursue readings at the direction of a faculty member in the department.

Courses Offered Abroad

GE 24310 – Intermediate Language Study (BCGS)

GE 34111 – Ludwig Wittgenstein: Philosophical Inquiries

GE 34210 – Opera and Culture

GE 34211 – Film in the GDR

GE 34212 – U.S. Perceptions of Germany and the Germans from Bismarck to Hitler (Berlin)

GE 34310 – Intermediate Advanced Language Study (BCGS)

GE 34311 – Travel Literature in Africa

GE 34320 – Advanced Language Study (BCGS)

GE 34411 – Berlin Fantastic

GE 34420 – The European Union

GE 34450 – Munich and National Socialism

GE 34511 – Berlin in Literature

GE 34802 – Berlin East-East-West

GE 44347- Imagining Europe: From the Age of Enlightenment to the Age of the Euro

GE 44426- Remembering the Great War in Britain and Germany

GE 44675 – Migration und Literatur

POLS 34205 – International Politics

POLS 34290 – Foreign Policy of Germany